• Do Carpet Beetles Live In Beds?

    12 July 2018
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    Do Carpet Beetles Live In Beds?

    Can Carpet Beetles Live in Beds?

    Before we get down to finding out if they can live in beds or not, let’s find out what exactly are carpet beetles.

    Carpet Beetle Features:

    • About 1/8 inches in size
    • Oval shaped
    • Red-orange stripes on black colored body studded with scales
    • A pair of antennae and wings complements three pairs of legs
    • Round bulgy eyes hide the head of the carpet beetle
    • Known for its love of carpets

    Now that you know why it’s called a carpet beetle let’s see where you’ll find them.

    Where Can You Find Carpet Beetle?

    Indoors, the beetles prefer to inhabit areas like the basement and attics and wherever they are likely to come across dead insects to eat, and abandoned nests to stay in. Outdoors, they zero in on old nests belonging to birds and rodents, to live and mate while feasting upon pollen and nectar.

    They find their way into our homes via chinks in foundations, door and window frames. They even sometimes piggyback on the plants and flowers that we take home. Carpet beetles food preferences range from plants and flowers to fur, fabric, and hair too.

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    Related Article:

    Life Cycle of Carpet Beetles: Phases from Eggs to Adults

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    The Damage Carpet Beetles Can Do

    The larval hairs of carpet beetles can lead to lung irritations when inhaled. That apart, carpet beetle larvae chew on the fabric materials in our homes and taking a toll on costly furs, curtains, carpets, and upholstery. So having carpet beetles in your home is a health hazard.

    Can Carpet Beetles Live in Beds?

    Going back to our question as to whether carpet beetles live in beds, the answer would be no. Carpet beetles can get in your bed as they might get attracted by animal-based products of your bed and eat the fabrics. But unlike bed bugs, they don’t live in your mattress.

    It’s not the adult carpet beetles, but the larvae that devour the bed linen and furnishings in our bedrooms. Most people confuse bed bugs for carpet beetles. 

    Therefore when you suspect the pest infestation in your bedroom furnishings, call for professional pest exterminators who can distinguish between the two and advise you on the best course of action.

    A carpet beetle in the larvae stage

    A carpet beetle in the larvae stage

    Although carpet beetles do not bite, their larval hairs are prickly and give us rashes that are typically red and itchy.”

    Control Exterminating – NYC Exterminator

    So if you ever experience insect bites in your sleep, you’re most likely the victim of bed bug bites. Somewhat akin to an apple seed, bed bugs drink our blood while carpet beetles don’t.

    The differences extend to the environment that each of these pests prefers – bed bugs are primarily found indoors due to the potential proximity to humans, and the opportunity to sup on our blood. Therefore you’ll come across bed bugs in the ribbing surrounding mattresses and furniture.

    Carpet beetles, on the other hand, are mostly outdoor insects and only foray indoors to lay eggs and nurse them.

    Do Carpet Beetles Bite Humans?

    Carpet beetles are also drawn to human beings by the carbon-dioxide they exhale. When we are resting or fast asleep, the carpet beetles venture out of their hiding spots.

    But instead of biting us and drawing blood, they attack the fabric and fur based materials like carpets, rugs, socks etc. Therefore, if you wake up to the sight of horrible rashes on your arms and feet, don’t rush to conclusions.

    Search the area on your bed carefully with a magnifying glass, and look for larval skin casings lying around. If you find them it means carpet beetle larvae are the culprits whose hairs have caused bite-like reactions on your skin.

    It’s time to call for professional help to clear the house of carpet beetles. It is advisable to seek help from trained exterminators as they can easily distinguish between bed bugs and carpet beetles.

    Once that is done they can decide upon the appropriate course of action. This usually involves vigorous steam cleaning and application of chemical pesticides in the right concentration and proportions.***

    Featured Image: Varied Carpet Beetle by Ryan Hodnett [CC BY-SA 4.0]

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  • Life Cycle of Carpet Beetles: Phases from Eggs to Adults

    10 July 2018
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    Life Cycle of Carpet Beetles: Phases from Eggs to Adults

    Life Cycle of Carpet Beetles:

    Phases from Eggs to Adults

    Your familiarity with the lifecycle of these beetles will come in handy in their early detection and control. So, it is important that we have a look at the series of their developmental changes.

    If you live in a warm place, for instance in a southern state in the United States, then you are likely to encounter carpet beetles at your home or workplace. 

    These insects tend to hide in upholstered furniture and feed on textiles made of plant or animal products such as fur, hair, dander, silk as well as feathers.

    Why Carpet Beetles Are A Concern

    Although they don’t bite people, carpet beetles are not friendly to have around at your home as prolonged contact with their body fibers can result into bumpy, itchy, rashes. The rashes share some resemblance with bed bug bites. 

    Therefore, you ought to be on the lookout to spot these pests as soon as they get away into your place. Your familiarity with the lifecycle of these beetles will come in handy in their early detection and control. So, it is important that we have a look at the series of their developmental changes.

    The Life Cycle of Carpet Beetles

    Carpet beetles undergo full metamorphosis which includes going through the egg, larva, pupa as well as adult stages. Depending on how cold or hot the surrounding environment is, a carpet beetle takes four months to a year to develop from the egg stage all the way to the adult stage.

    Eggs

    A female carpet beetle lay many egg batches at a time, each having about 20 to 100 eggs. The eggs are white in color, oval in shape and each is approximately 0.35mm wide while its length is around 0.75mm. The pests can thrive outdoors, but sometimes the mothers decide to lay eggs indoors for proximity to food sources. 

    When laid indoors, the eggs take about 5 to 21 days to hatch but the period is dependent on the prevailing climatic conditions as well as the involved carpet beetles species.  

    Upon close inspection of an area with a carpet beetle infestation, the eggs are likely to be found in hidden spots near baseboards or dark closets.

    Larvae

    Carpet beetle eggs hatch into larvae within one to three weeks. A carpet beetle larva is 5mm long, oval and has a brown hair covering. They feed on dander and hair fabrics, among other plant or animal product materials, as well as packaged food such as flour and cereals. 

    The larvae undergo molting, but the number of instars of each species is different; it ranges from 6 to 12. It takes a larva two to three months before it pupates. Interestingly, at this stage, a carpet beetle can stay go for several weeks without eating anything.

    a carpet beetle larvae

    Carpet Beetle

    “A carpet beetle larva is 5mm long, oval and has a brown hair covering. They feed on dander and hair fabrics, among other plant or animal product materials, as well as packaged food such as flour and cereals.”

    Control Exterminating – NYC Exterminator

    Pupae

    At the pupae stage, young carpet beetles develop in a skin that looks like a cocoon to a maximum of 20 days before becoming adults. They pupate near or on the items that they were eating during the larval stage. They are white.

    Adults

    Once the pupae period is over (two to three weeks), the young carpet beetles mature and become adults. An adult carpet beetle is approximately 2 to 3.5 mm long. It may appear molted with black, brown, as well as white or can be solid black. 

    The color depends on the species of that particular beetle you are seeing. Adult carpet beetles are less harmful than their larval counterparts. Although they feed on flower pollen, the adults don’t damage flowers.  

    You can see them flying through open windows or doors as they are attracted by light. One week after joining adulthood, female carpet beetles start to lay eggs, leading to a rapid increase in the population of the pests in the area they have invaded.

    Hopefully, you are now more familiar with carpet beetles than ever before. Watch them out at your home or workplace and eradicate them as soon as you find them to avoid the damages they bring about. If you have a carpet beetle infestation you can’t handle by yourself, don’t wait to call Control Exterminating Company. ***

    Life Cycle of Carpet Beetles: Phases from Eggs to Adults

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